Harbor House of Central Florida Inc.
P.O. Box 680748
Orlando FL 32868
Contact Information
Address P.O. Box 680748
Orlando, FL 32868
Phone (407) 886-2244
Fax (407) 886-0006
Web and Social Media
Donate with a credit card http://www.harborhousefl.com/donate
Video
Mission
Mission

Harbor House works to prevent and eliminate domestic abuse in Central Florida by providing critical life-saving services to survivors, implementing and advancing best practices, and educating and engaging the community in a united front.

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Carol Ann Wick LMFT
Board Chair Lincoln Salmon
Board Chair Company Affiliation Salmon Agency
History
IRS Ruling Year 1979
Former Names
NameYear
Spouse Abuse, Inc.2008
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $3,393,536.00
Projected Expenses $3,235,684.00
Statements
Mission

Harbor House works to prevent and eliminate domestic abuse in Central Florida by providing critical life-saving services to survivors, implementing and advancing best practices, and educating and engaging the community in a united front.

Impact

 Accomplishments in 2013-2014:

  • We reached thousands of people in our community. 14,000 were trained in our R3 training, 10,000 safety plans were completed, 6,382 hotline calls were answered, 5,111 individuals were assisted with injunctions and court services and more than 29,530 nights of safety were provided to over 1030 adults and children in our emergency shelter.
  • The EVE (Early Victim Engagement) program has been implemented this year to reduce the number of intimate partner
    homicides and increase the successful prosecution rate in Orange County, Florida through collaboration with professionals in the civil and criminal justice system to enhance and maintain a comprehensive system of survivor safety and batterer accountability. Through the EVE program, we now have an
    advocate located at the Orange County Jail and recently we launched the EVE program with the Apopka Police Department.
  • On Jan 31st, 2013, Harbor House of Central Florida announced that its R3 App, which had won an international award in the Ending Violence @ Home App Challenge presented by the Institute of
    Medicine and the Avon Foundation for Women, had now been cited in The New England Journal of Medicine.
  • Harbor House participated in the Domestic Violence Commission with elected officials, first responders and community leaders to provide recommendations about how to eliminate domestic abuse in Central Florida. 
  • In a 3-hour period, during our It Takes Courage prevention event, more than 725 volunteers canvased Central Florida and placed more than 20,000 door hangers with the message "It Takes Courage To Stop Domestic Abuse!"
  • Our first Men of Courage Breakfast brought together more than 125 male community leaders and business executives to discuss domestic abuse and its effects in the workplace.
  • Our Walk a Mile in Her Shoes event, which was held on March 13th, featured more than 300 brave individuals who walked in heels down the streets of downtown Orlando. The event raised $20,000—enough to provide 300 nights of safe housing for survivors.
  • We established a drop in office at the Community Food and Outreach Center allowing survivors easy access to our services.
  • The Harbor House R3 app was downloaded by more than 4800 people from every continent on the globe.  
  • Harbor House earned the Guidestar Gold designation, which is the highest rating a non-profit agency can receive for transparency, reliability and impact.

 

 
Independent Research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or program effectiveness? Yes
Needs Operational funds – The agency has increased capacity to meet the growing domestic abuse epidemic in Central Florida. Since 2006, the demand for our emergency shelter services has quadrupled. Then we served 250 individuals. During the last fiscal year, we served more than 1,000. Donations are always needed to assist the agency to meet the growing demand for emergency services. Nearly $1 million must be raised annually to meet operational needs and to generate matching funds that are used to draw down additional federal support. There is no charge for any Harbor House service. Those living in our emergency shelter are provided with food, clothing, hygiene items, as well as counseling and safe shelter.
  1. Survivor Support – This fund pays for critical items such as prescriptions, transportation, fees for identification and birth certificates.
  2. Survivor Specific Items – Items to support survivors and their children while in shelter especially personal care items, diapers and other children's items, laundry detergent, cleaning supplies, gas cards, and grocery gift cards for the purchase of fresh fruit, meat and vegetables.
  3. Volunteers – Harbor House has over 1,500 volunteers that assist with direct support (answering hotlines, running support groups) to providing meals and doing facility repairs and improvements. Other volunteers serve on the board of directors, assist with special events and facilitate activities for survivor families.
  4. Capital Improvement – Harbor House must replace two existing 32 bed residential facilities within the next 3-5 years due to deteriorating conditions. The estimated cost of the new emergency shelter is $7 million. 
Background
CEO Statement Since 2002, domestic violence homicides in Orange County have increased 187% resulting in nearly 25% of all homicides and 90% of all murders of women. The impact has been devastating to our children with 80% of DCF child abuse cases resulting from exposure to domestic violence - making it the leading cause of maltreatment of the children in our region. Harbor House is the sole provider of domestic abuse services for Orange County. Since the downturn in the economy, the demand for Harbor House’s unique services, especially safe housing, has skyrocketed. Last year alone the average stay in shelter  increased from 45 days to a staggering 80 day stay. The result caused Harbor House to go 108 days over capacity, increasing the number of bed nights by more than 30%. This is especially daunting for survivors who need to get out of shelter while having to decide between going back to their abuser and facing potential death or homelessness. Despite this increase in demand for the services we provide, we maintain our "open door" policy of never turning a survivor away.  Harbor House is committed to providing quality, empoweringand culturally-specific services to every person who requests them. We also recognize that 80% of domestic violence incidents go unreported and 98% of domestic violence homicide victims never call for help. As such, community outreach and awareness is the only way domestic abuse will ultimately be eliminated in our community. To do this effectively, Harbor House actively reaches out and engages community members, faith based groups, corporations and civic groups. Together, we can make our community and homes safe.
NTEE Information
Primary Organization Type Human Services
Primary Organization SubType Family Violence Shelters and Services
Secondary Organization Type Housing, Shelter
Tertiary Organization Type Youth Development
Areas Served
Geographic Areas Served
FL
Goals
HelpWhat is the organization aiming to accomplish? This is the organization's ultimate goal for intended impact.
Harbor House's ultimate goal is to end domestic abuse in Central Florida. To create this social change where we are proactively preventing domestic abuse versus reacting to the devastating and costly effects of it, we must create a community of active, trained bystanders on every level - from individual to societal (businesses, health care professionals, faith institutions) to systemic (courts, judges, public policy). We must essentially change the conversation about domestic abuse so the perception is that this is not a womens' issue, it is not a family issue, and it is not a behind-closed-doors issue...it is a community issue.  
 
Public awareness is a key component to ensuring our message is both far-reaching and resonates with targeted populations. We must deliver our targeted messaging to the right people through the right channel at the right time. This includes targeted materials for our diverse, multicultural population and outreach efforts with key messaging developed specifically for those populations.  
 
Our goals are:
  1. Every youth trained will become a Leader of Courage or Little Leader
  2. Every health care provider will screen their patients for domestic abuse
  3. Every first responder will utilize our InVEST Crisis Response Team
  4. Every business will become a Key Business Partner, implementing policies to address domestic abuse in the workplace and increase workplace safety 
  5. Every faith institution will provide their congregation with Recognize, Respond, Refer (R3) programming
Strategies
HelpWhat are the organization's strategies for its stated long-term goals?

Our strategies for achieving social change are focused on creating a community of active bystanders. To do this, we utilize our core philosophy of Recognize, Respond, Refer (R3), which teaches our community how to recognize domestic abuse, respond to it effectively and refer survivors to safety. 

For example, our Project Courage initiative is a targeted effort in two communities in Orange County. Beginning in 2009, our goal was to saturate the first community--Pine Castle--with knowledge, training programs and events to help eradicate domestic abuse in that area. We went into schools, businesses, health care providers, government agencies and faith institutions with training and programming focused on our core philosophy of Recognize, Respond and Refer (R3). Armed with information about how to recognize domestic abuse, how to respond to it effectively and how to refer survivors to safety, we were able to develop significant partnerships and change attitudes and behaviors.
 
Results from the project courage initiative have demonstrated over the years that though there is a large number of 911 calls, individuals are choosing to file injunctions and participate in counseling rather than seek refuge at our shelter, proving that our efforts are working.
 
Building on this, our strategies for future success are the following:
  1. Strengthen individual knowledge and skills to prevent violence and promote safety.
  2. Promote community education by reaching targeted groups of people with information and resources to prevent violence and promote safety.
  3. Educate providers who will transmit skills and knowledge to others and model positive norms.
  4. Foster coalitions and networks that bring together groups and individuals for broader goals and greater impact.
  5. Change organizational practices by assisting these organizations in adopting regulations and shaping norms to prevent violence and improve safety.
  6. Influence policies and legislation by encouraging laws and policies by enacted that support healthy community norms and a violence-free society.
Capabilities
HelpWhat are the organization’s capabilities for doing this? What resources, capacities, and connections support its progress towards long-term goals?
Our internal resources include a highly-trained and experienced staff who promote trauma-informed care and an empowerment model for survivors. Coupled with a strong board of directors that is well-connected, influential in the community and committed to our mission, we have the right people to accomplish our goals. Our executive-level board brings a wide array of expertise in strategic development, financial services, human resources, communications and governance, and their expertise and involvement has been instrumental to our success.
 
Our CEO is considered the go-to resource in our community for anything and everything related to the issue of domestic abuse. She is recognized as a trusted resource for the media, other organizations, community leaders and elected officials. Therefore, her leadership positions Harbor House as a trusted resource in the mind of the Central Florida community, which in turns strengthens our ability to affect change. 
 
Financially, our organization uses multiple methods to determine the financial health of the organization. Harbor House has been very successful in keeping our overhead averaging between 12-14% in any given year. The various measurements of financial health we employ compared to an average nonprofit agency in a similar industry indicate we are performing at an "above average" level. See attachments.
In fact, our audited financial statements from the last fiscal year show a
surplus of $488,800. Year to date revenue includes capital campaign dollars of $68,787, capital improvement dollars of $206,951 and restricted grants of $146,472, leaving a surplus of  $66,590 to put back into our reserves.

Externally, our community partnerships include homeless coalitions, child welfare agencies, health care partners and law enforcement agencies. Our collaborations with other agencies again strengthens our ability to affect change. By communicating the same message about domestic abuse from other trusted organizations, we are maximizing visibility in our community and pushing the issue to the forefront of the societal discussion. In addition, we are a valued member of the Domestic Violence Commission, which is comprised of leaders from nearly every agency that touches the criminal justice system in domestic violence cases. Through our involvement we have been able to offer tangible solutions to community-wide problems identified during the Commission's research process. Recently, we presented our solutions to the Orange County Board of County Commissioners, and they approved additional funding in support of our recommendations. 
Indicators
HelpHow will the organization know if it is making progress? What are the key qualitative and quantitative indicators against which the organization assesses its progress toward its intended impact?

On a community level, several indicators illustrate that our efforts are working:
  • 911 calls are down 5% in 2012; this reduction saved Orange County taxpayers $414,000.
  • Conversely, Harbor House services are up 7% overall with an 11% increase in hotline calls.
  • Individuals are getting help before needing intervention by law enforcement = saving lives, saving taxpayer dollars.
  • 23% of emergency shelter residents are now referred by family/friend vs. 15% by law enforcement (the exact opposite of what we saw five years ago).

Internally, we use several methods of measurement to identify progress toward our intended impact. These include: 

Survey Cards

Each survivor receives a survey card every time they work with an advocate, which we use to ensure they feel that they were seen and heard and that they now feel safe and empowered.

From July 2013 through June 2014, the percent of survivors served in shelter, through outreach and through court services reported:

  • 91%:  I feel that staff listened to me and understood my situation.
  • 80%:  I feel that staff supported my decisions.
  • 87% : I feel safer because of my interaction with Harbor House today.

Comments include:

  • This is a very nice and safe place for women and their children to be and a dangerous time.
  • Having [staff] in court with me was so reassuring. She touched my hand to quiet me when I began to stir as he lied on and on. She's been very comforting.
  • I feel empowered by just having people listening and understanding.

Metrics Program

Our evaluation efforts also include a metrics program used to measure the impact of our advocates’ work:

•         Shelter:

1.     90% of shelter residents will have safe housing when leaving shelter.
2.     50% of shelter residents will increase their income following exit.
3.     80% of residents will complete at least one satisfaction card.
4.     85% retention for shelter volunteers.

Hotline:

1.      95% of callers identified as high lethality will receive a safety plan.
2.      40% of hotline callers will be linked to services.

Children’s Services:

1.     80% of children in shelter will have a safety plan.
2.     100% of children in shelter will receive a welcome and discharge session with advocate.

Outreach:

1.     70% of Outreach participants will return for a second visit.
2.     50% of Outreach participants will attend a support group.
3.     100% of children will receive a referral for children’s counseling.
4.     85% retention for Outreach volunteers.

Courthouse:

1.     90% of high lethality cases will receive a safety plan.
2.     70% of high lethality cases will receive an Outreach referral.
3.     30% acceptance of services for those identified in the InVEST program.
4.     85% retention for Courthouse volunteers.


Progress
HelpWhat has and hasn’t been accomplished so far?
As a result of our concentrated efforts focusing on R3 and creating a community of active bystanders, last year were able to report more than 65% of health professionals in our Project Courage community of Pine Castle said they will change their patient evaluation routine to include R3. In addition, 90% of faith leaders and parishioners surveyed said they now understood "how to Recognize, Respond and Refer a domestic abuse survivor." In the business community, 99% of those trained stated that when confronted by a domestic abuse survivor, they would help him or her get the resources needed to be safe. That is social change.
 
However, there is more work to do. 
  1. We have reached ten schools and 2,673 youth in Orange County with youth prevention programming (Leaders of Courage/Little Leaders). We want to reach every school in Orange County.
  2. We have trained 797 health care providers on screening patients for domestic abuse. We want every health care provider to screen their patients for domestic abuse.
  3. We have trained 1,607 first responders on R3 and our InVEST program. We want all first responders in Orange County to utilize our InVEST Crisis Response Team.
  4. We are working with 111 businesses and have established 47 as Key Business Partners. We want every business in Orange County to become a Key Business Partner. 
  5. We have trained 26 faith institutions on providing R3 programming to their congregations. We want every faith institution to provide their congregation with Recognize, Respond, Refer (R3) programming.
 
Programs
Description
With 110 beds, Harbor House is one of the largest most comprehensive domestic abuse shelters in the U.S. Last year, 1030 adults and children stayed in our emergency shelter's safe short-term housing for a total of 25,044 nights. Our safe short-term housing operates a 24-hour hotline, 365 days a year, completing over 10,000 safety plans annually. This program employs state certified staff and offers onsite medical services, counseling, case management and crisis intervention. Harbor House is one of only three domestic abuse shelters in Florida to offer licensed childcare, five days a week, at no cost to survivors residing in shelter. With a capacity for 60+ children, trauma-informed and age appropriate programming helps children recover and allows mothers to heal from their injuries, locate alternative housing, and seek employment, thus becoming economically independent and free from dependency on the abuser.
Population Served Adults
Victims
Homeless
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
90% of survivors residing in shelter for over 48 hours will work with an advocate to complete a comprehensive case plan to include safety planning, a needs assessment, and community referrals.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

90% of shelter residents will have safe housing when leaving shelter.

50% of shelter residents will increase their income following exit.
 
80% of residents will complete at least one satisfaction card.
 
85% retention for shelter volunteers.

95% of callers identified as high lethality will receive a safety plan.

40% of hotline callers will be linked to services.

80% of children in shelter will receive child care services.

100% of children in shelter will receive a welcome and discharge session with an advocate.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Program success is monitored in several ways: through the success stories of the survivors and advocate case notes, which includes a detailed safety plan and case plan. All intake documentation and case notes are reported in the survivor's file and entered into the ALICE database, a program designed for domestic violence centers. Satisfaction surveys are also completed by the shelter residents and monitored by supervisors.  
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Rosa never thought that domestic abuse could happen to her until she met her former boyfriend, who mentally and physically tortured her for several years. He was a well-respected man in the community but at home, he terrorized Rosa with his controlling behavior. When Rosa came to Harbor House, she was traumatized and afraid for her life. She had recently lost her job because her former boyfriend stalked her at her place of employment. She was terrified that her ex would find her and kill her. Through safety planning and case management in the emergency shelter, Rosa was able to gain the skills and confidence that she needed to move forward with her life. As a result of living in a safe and stable environment, Rosa recently obtained full time employment at a local bank. She moved into our Transitional Housing program and is saving money to move into her own apartment. She has expressed that she feels much more confident through the encouragement and support of Harbor House.

 

 

Description
This program serves more than 800 survivors annually at multiple locations throughout the Central Florida community. Working with survivors who no longer need safe short-term Housing, outreach advocates provide crisis counseling, safety planning, relocation
assistance and support groups. This past year, 123 adults attended these support groups.

As part of our outreach services, our Community Based Transitional Housing program empowers survivors to achieve self-sufficiency through supported rent and job placement. The Community Based Transitional Housing program has become one of the most successful Community Based Transitional Housing programs in the nation, with 100% of our survivors achieving permanent housing. During the last fiscal year, Harbor House served 53 families alone through this program.
Population Served Victims
Adults
Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
90% of survivors with children receiving Outreach services will receive a referral for child counseling.
 
For survivors receiving Outreach services, 50% will attend support groups. 
 
70% of survivors receiving Outreach services will attend two or more individual sessions.
 
85% retention for Outreach volunteers.
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
100% of children will receive a referral for children's counseling.
 
90% of survivors referred to Outreach from Emergency Shelter will receive a follow up call from an Outreach advocate. Of those referred, 60% will attend accept Outreach services.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored in several ways: through the success stories of the survivors and advocate case notes, which includes a detailed safety plan and case plan. All intake documentation and case notes are reported in the survivor's file and entered into the ALICE database, a program designed for domestic abuse centers. Satisfaction surveys are also completed by the survivors and monitored by supervisors.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Sarah was a homeless survivor of domestic abuse who came to the Outreach program having lived in a tent for months. She was unemployed and wanted to work; however, without an address she was unable to obtain the necessary documentation needed for employment. Sarah was referred to the Community Based Housing program. With a stable place to live, she was able to focus on her employment needs. She met regularly with the Community Based Housing Specialist and was provided the following services: safety planning, assistance with obtaining necessary identification, and credit repair through the Financial Empowerment workshops. As a result, Sarah recently obtained full time employment. Sarah is now healthier and her self-esteem has significantly improved. She has expressed an interest in some day volunteering as an advocate for a domestic abuse center and states that she thanks Harbor House for changing her life.

Description
Our Court Services program provides assistance and support to more than 7, 936 survivors of abuse annually and reaches the largest number of individuals of any program offered by Harbor House. Advocates provide assistance with injunctions for protection and stalking, translation services, court accompaniment and crisis intervention. During the last fiscal year, our court advocates provided more than 4,661 hours of advocacy, safety planning, court accompaniment and filed more than 5,111 domestic/dating/sexual violence injunctions.

Another innovative and life-saving program, Early Victim Engagement (EVE), brings together advocates, law enforcement and child protective services to prevent homicides and serious injury for hundreds of survivors in highly dangerous situations. Currently we have EVE advocates in three of the 12 municipalities in Orange County, and within three years we will have an advocate in all 12. This year alone, the EVE team has contacted more than 1,125 survivors to offer services. The EVE team, working with the Department of Children and Families, provided advocacy services to 184 families.
Population Served
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
For survivors in the courthouse program, 90% of those identified as high lethality will receive a safety plan.
 
85% retention for Courthouse volunteers. 
 
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
70% of all InVEST survivors receiving services will be referred to an Outreach support group. Of those referred, 50% will attend support groups. 
 
30% of those identified for the InVEST program will accept services. 
 
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored in several ways: through the success stories of the survivors and advocate case notes, which includes a detailed safety plan and case plan. All intake documentation and case notes are reported in the survivor's file and entered into the ALICE database, a program designed for domestic abuse centers. Satisfaction surveys are also completed by survivors and monitored by supervisors.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Ebony had been married to her husband for eight years before arriving at the Harbor House court program. Throughout the marriage, Ebony endured physical and verbal abuse. The abuse began with her husband belittling her and calling her names. A few years into the marriage, he became physically abusive toward Ebony. The incident that led her to contact law enforcement was when he beat her so badly that she ended up in the hospital with severe injuries. She contacted the police and they referred her to the courthouse to file for an injunction for protection against domestic violence. Advocates at the courthouse assisted her with completing her petition for an injunction and also took pictures of the bruises around her eyes and neck from the physical attack. She received a safety plan and a referral to Outreach Services. The judge granted Ebony a temporary injunction for protection. She later wrote a letter to Harbor House stating that she is forever grateful for the courthouse program.
Description
Primary prevention programs range from the our Leaders of Courage initiative, which focuses on middle and high school youth, to Little Leaders, which is tailored to pre-K through elementary youth and educated children about healthy relationships, bullying and safe bystander intervention. This fiscal year the Prevention program reached 2,650 youth.
 
The overarching Project Courage initiative seeks to engage the community to end domestic abuse by focusing all of our services in a specific geographic area. Project Courage reaches all levels of the community from youth in the Leaders of Courage program to businesses in our Key Business initiative to community leaders and faith institutions. Three years after its launch in March 2010, Project Courage continues to have an astounding effect in the Pine Castle community.  Due to this success, Project Courage was replicated in the Malibu Groves neighborhood in August 2011.  
Population Served Adults
Families
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Youth who participate in school programming will show a 15% increase in knowledge of abusive behaviors as measured by the pre/post survey questions.
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
80% of youth participating in Prevention services will complete the Leaders of Courage programming in its entirety. 
 
There will be a 20% increase in the number of adults participating in Prevention programming. 
 
25% of adults participating in Prevention programming will attend more than two community events. 
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Prevention program success is measured by participant pre/post evaluation surveys and success stories, along with facilitator evaluations.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

The Leaders of Courage curriculum is designed to educate youth about the dynamics of abusive/unhealthy relationships. Throughout the 9-week program, youth will define abuse and respect, learn skills for effective communication, recognize red flags, bullying behaviors, learn safe bystander intervention, understand gender stereotypes, and create strategies with youth that raise awareness about intimate partner violence to their schools and communities. After attending two groups, a youth participant recognized that she was in an unhealthy relationship. She was no longer in the relationship but he was becoming increasingly aggressive with her. Through the Leaders of Courage program, the woman was able to recognize the signs of an abusive relationship. After safety planning with the woman, the advocate has followed up and she continues to attend the groups. She has become a leader among her peers and has become a strong proponent for the success of the Leaders of Courage program.

Description

Harbor House provides professional education about domestic abuse to law enforcement, businesses, health care providers, social services and human resource professionals. This specialized training includes successful ways to deal with survivors and abusers. In addition, the program sheds light on the warning signs to detect if abuse is present in a home situation.

Harbor House staff and trained volunteers facilitate educational presentations to the community at large. These presentations are focused on our core curriculum -- Recognize, Respond and Refer (R3). R3 educates individuals on how to recognize domestic abuse, respond to it effectively and refer survivors to safety. During the last fiscal year, Harbor House held 417 presentations and trained 1,672 individuals.

In 2012, the R3 App was created by Harbor House of Central Florida for its Project Courage initiative and community education training to encourage healthcare professionals and those at risk to Recognize, Respond and Refer (R3) to Domestic Abuse. R3 is the first app to
have information that aids medical professionals in hospitals, doctors' offices and clinics to make appropriate assessments of domestic abuse victims and refer them to resources that can help. No other tool is geared toward both healthcare professionals as well as those at risk.

Since 2012:

36,168 individuals attended Harbor House trainings and presentations

4,868 people have downloaded the R3 App effecting screening practices of hospitals and across the globe.

1,607 First Responders were trained to Recognize, Respond and Refer.

797 Physicians were trained to screen for domestic abuse.

2,673 youth were trained to safely intervene when they see abuse and bullying happen.

The R3 App was a winner in the “Ending Violence @ Home Global App Challenge” and was recognized in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Population Served
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored by pre and post test evaluations and facilitator evaluations.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
The Orlando Sentinel published an article highlighting the success of our business education initiative. The article (published on 9/19/12) stated: "A program aimed at bringing awareness and an eventual end to domestic violence is showing success in one Orange County Community. The privately funded program is aimed at spreading awareness about the dynamics of domestic violence in the community through training based on the R3 method-recognize, respond and refer-to help victims of domestic violence."
Description

On December 6 2012, The Paws for Peace Kennel opened and welcomed its first pet, a guinea pig, just two days later. Since then 49 dogs, 15 cats, one bird, one guinea pig and one turtle have been residents of the kennel, allowing 43 families to seek safe shelter without having to leave their family pet behind.

Population Served General/Unspecified
Description

Harbor House opened the doors of the Donation Center on December 6, 2012. A multipurpose facility, the center allows Harbor House to bring in large quantities of donations such as cleaning supplies and paper products that are used to run one of the largest domestic abuse programs in the US. Since its opening, $704,166 worth of goods have been donated and invested in our mission.

Population Served Victims
Board Chair
Board Chair Lincoln Salmon
Company Affiliation Salmon Agency
Term July 2014 to June 2015
Board Co-Chair
Board Co-Chair Lincoln Salmon
Company Affiliation Salmon Agency, Inc.
Term Start July 2014 June 2015
Board
Board Members
NameCompany AffiliationsStatusCertificate*
Angel Buchanan Wells FargoVoting
Sheila Bystrak Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & BabiesVoting
Toni Caracciolo SeaWorld Parks & EntertainmentVoting
Tony Cardoza Bank of AmericaVoting
Mario Castro Cisco Systems, Inc.Voting
Earl Crittenden Jr.Gray RobinsonVoting
Linda Ewing Massey Services, Inc.Voting
Laura Genette WKMG - Local 6Voting
Audra Hollifield Orlando MagicVoting
Vicki Johnson Ron Sachs CommunicationsVoting
Michelle Latham State Attorneys OfficeVotingNo
Margaret Lezcano Community VolunteerVoting
Barbara Lezcano Morgan StanleyVoting
Verbelee Nielson-Swanson Florida HospitalVoting
Beverly Paulk Community VolunteerVoting
Ruffin Rhodes AIARhodes + Brito Architects IncVoting
Pilar Riley WonderWorks AttractionsVoting
Ron Sachs Community VolunteerVoting
Lincoln Salmon Salmon Agency, Inc.Voting
Jill Schwartz Jill S. Schwartz & Associates, P.A.Voting
Nina Yon United Methodist Volunteer in MissionVoting
Janet Ziomek Connextions, Inc.Voting
*This individual has been awarded a Certificate in Orientation to Board Service by the Rollins College Philanthropy & Nonprofit Leadership Center http://pnlc.rollins.edu, the Central Florida Partnership www.centralfloridapartnership.org, and the Central Florida Foundation www.cffound.org.
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 14
Hispanic/Latino 4
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Other (if specified) 1
Policies
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 17%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Standing Committees
Standing Committees
Committee Name
Executive
Finance
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Board Development / Board Orientation
Operations
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
Advisory Board
NameCompany Affiliation
Dick Batchelor Dick Batchelor Management Group
Glen Casel Community Based Care of Seminole
Brigitte Dagot Honorary Consul, France
Anthony Davis No Limit Ministries
Johnny Duncan Duncan Consulting, Inc
Michael Freeman UCF Wellness & Health Services
Dr. Jan Garavaglia District 9 Medical Examiner's Office
Catherine Jackson Community Volunteer
Dr. Jana Jasinski UCF Associate Professor of Sociology
Jodie Kalmus Darden Restaurants
Richard Lapchick University of Central Florida DeVos Sports Management Program
Lt. Bruce McMullen Orange County Sheriff's Office
Joyce Pastorek No Abuse Inc
Trish Price Florida Hospital
Laurent Prosper Honorary Consul, Haiti
Dr. Kevin Sherin State of Florida Department of Health
Bob Smedley Orange County Corrections/Probation
Laura Williams
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Carol Ann Wick LMFT
Term Start Aug 2006
Email cwick@harborhousefl.com
Experience

Carol Wick began her career working with children and families after obtaining her Bachelor’s Degree from Florida State University and her Master’s Degree from Auburn University. She is a licensed therapist and an approved supervisor.    

Carol’s first job was providing in home and in school therapy to families in Charlotte, North Carolina. She worked as the Program Director for a grassroots women’s support organization called WomanReach providing support groups and peer counseling to hundreds of women each year. 

Carol returned to Florida to accept a position as the Coordinator of the newly formed Collier County Sexual Abuse Taskforce and Treatment Team. There she developed strong working partnerships with all members of the child abuse system from investigation to prosecution to therapeutic treatment of both victims and young offenders. 

Fulfilling a need to return to working in gender issues, Carol worked as Social Services Director then as Executive Director of PACE Center for Girls for 16 years. During her time at PACE, she was part of a research team with the National Council on Crime and Delinquency that studied the status and treatment of girls in Florida prisons. She has also been involved in best practices in gender responsive programming and quality assurance in the juvenile justice system. During her tenure, the agency was ranked 1 in quality in the State of Florida on 3 occasions. 

Since returning to Orlando and joining Harbor House, Carol has worked to improve community partnerships and engage leaders in social change around domestic abuse issues. Under her leadership, the Harbor House shelter capacity increased 111% with over $5 million in capital improvements including a kennel for pets; Project Courage an innovative community prevention program was launched with astounding first year results; and the first domestic violence screening app, R3, was launched.   

Carol has twice been recognized as the Executive Woman of the Year Award in Volusia County and received the Juneteenth Hometown Hero Award for her leadership in the preservation and restoration of the 100 year old African American Rigby School. She has served as President of the Heart of Florida United Way’s Council of Agency Executives, was a United Way Board member, a board member of Florida Executive Women and member of the League of Women Voters. She serves on the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Legislative Agenda Committee and State of Florida CPI redesign committee. Carol is a frequent speaker and trainer and has appeared on national shows such as Dr. G Medical Examiner and Nancy Grace.

Carol had been married to David for 15 years is the mother of a beautiful 11 year old daughter. She volunteers in her free time with her dog JoJo as a certified pet therapy team and is also a Girl Scout leader with a troop of 12 wonderful girls.

CEO Salary Range $125,001 - $150,000
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 50
Number of Part Time Staff 14
Number of Volunteers 1955
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 72%
Senior Staff
Title Chief Operating Officer
Experience/Biography

Heather Wilkie is the Chief Operating Officer of Harbor House of Central Florida. She holds a Master’s Degree in Mental Health Counseling from Rollins College and a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and Sociology from the University of North Carolina in Asheville. Mrs. Wilkie has been with Harbor House for over eight years, serving as an advocate in the courthouse program and as the legal services manager for four years. During this time, she served as the secretary for the Domestic Violence Task Force and has been a member for seven years. She is very passionate about women’s issues and social justice advocacy. Mrs. Wilkie is also a member of the American Counseling Association serves on the Executive Board of Directors for the Orlando Fringe Festival. 

Title Chief Development Officer
Experience/Biography

Michelle Brady Palmer is the Chief Development Officer of Harbor House of Central Florida.  She holds a Master’s Degree in Business from the Rollins College Crummer Graduate School of Business and a Bachelor’s Degree in Communications from Clarion University of Pennsylvania. She has over 15 years of successful leadership in the nonprofit and public sectors. She is an active volunteer in community schools, the church and alumnae organizations.  In 2001, Michelle had a day named in her honor in the City of Orlando for her service to the community.

Title Chief Financial Officer
Experience/Biography Nicole DiPietro worked with Tijuana Flats since their inception in 1995- serving in a variety of roles from restaurant management and development to Vice President of Treasury and Corporate Finance. Nicole has both strong financial analysis and problem solving skills. 
Plans
Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 4
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Jan 2011
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Other
Collaborations
Harbor House collaborates with many local and national organizations and has formal memorandum of understanding or letters of support with most of them. These relationships allow Harbor House to be more effective and efficient. These collaborations include law enforcement, Clerk of Courts, Orange County Animal Services, United Way, Second Harvest Food Bank, local hospitals, faith institutions, emergency responders and other non profits.   
 
One of our most recent collaborations is with the Community Food and Outreach Center. For the first time, a domestic violence advocate will be located on-site, full time, at this downtown location that provides food, clothing, medical care and other resources for the poor and homeless.
 
In addition, we recently partnered with the Florida Agriculture and Mining (FAMU) College of Law to develop a clinical program through which law students learn about the injunction court and also provide a valuable service  by assisting survivors in the injunction process. The program begins with the Fall 2013 semester. Harbor House's Court Services Manager, a licensed Florida attorney, will teach a class on domestic violence law at the school and will also provides on-site supervision of the FAMU law students.  
Awards
AwardAwarding OrganizationYear
Champions for Children AwardCentral Florida Association of Fundraising Professionals2011
Ending Violence @ Home App ChallengeAvon Foundation & Institute of Medicine2012
CEO Comments Ms.
State Registration Yes
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start July 01, 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30, 2015
Documents
Form 990s
YearDocument
2013990
2012990
2011990
2010990
20092009 - 990
20082008 - 990
20072007 - 990
20062006 - 990
IRS Letter of Determination
2008 501 (c) 3
Other Financial Documents
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$346,072$566,656$400,335
Government Contributions$2,197,126$2,164,684$1,890,123
Federal$1,305,521$1,117,929$1,102,574
State$456,520$596,543$487,271
Local$432,635$317,691$300,278
Unspecified$2,450$132,521$0
Individual Contributions$605,812$520,838$240,315
$0$0$0
$0$0$0
Investment Income, Net of Losses$1,760$128$3,908
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$125,275$68,055$43,111
Revenue In-Kind$520,696$220,962$271,261
Other$36,554$10,666$33,079
Expense Allocations
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$2,850,402$2,616,471$2,191,687
Administration Expense$221,179$226,895$239,655
Fundraising Expense$188,117$112,162$106,584
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.151.191.12
Program Expense/Total Expenses87%89%86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue6%3%4%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$6,990,267$6,540,801$5,952,754
Current Assets$2,478,746$2,544,263$2,117,506
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$159,206$198,540$168,101
Total Net Assets$6,831,061$6,342,261$5,784,653
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountFederal Government $1,305,521Federal Government $1,117,929Federal Government $1,102,574
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndividuals $605,812State Government $596,543State Government $487,271
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountInkind Revenue $520,696Foundations and Corporations $566,656Foundations and Corporations $400,335
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities15.5712.8112.60
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments
Foundation Comments
Financial figures taken from 990.  990 and audit are reconciled.
The in-kind contribution revenue includes non-cash contributions and donated services and use of facilities as reported on the IRS Form 990. Donated services and facilities are not included in total revenue. Endowment fund is held at the Central Florida Foundation.
Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster
Notes Programs listed here are those that are only activated during a disaster. Some organizations have unified budgeting and do not budget by program. Because of this, some budget fields may be blank or represent an approximation. Organization describes previous experience during the immediate response, recovery or rebuilding phases following a disaster.